The Trail of Tears

The Trail of Tears

Removal of Cherokee Indians and others to Oklahoma. Nunna daul Tsuny — “The Trail Where They Cried” On January 10, 1806, President Thomas Jefferson addressed a gathering in front of the White House in Washington, D.C. The occasion — a concluding ceremony following a series of meetings with the chiefs of the Cherokee Indian Nation, and others, who had been…

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The United Cherokee Republic

Suppressed Report In Relation To Difficulties Between The Eastern And Western Cherokees

Congressman John Bell of Tennessee Letter to the editors of the National Intelligencer, Washington, July 27, 1840 In Morris L. Wardell’s book, “A Political History of The Cherokee Nation 1838-1907,” he mentions the John Bell Suppressed Report in the footnotes on page 16 and 17. He also mentions Sarah Ridge’s letter to the “Arkansas Gazette” on page 16. Mr. Bell…

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Indian Treaties as Sovereign Contracts

By Professor Robert J. Miller, Lewis & Clark Law School, Portland, Oregon The United States government, from its very inception, continued the English and colonial strategy of dealing with the Indian tribal nations on a government-to-government basis through treaty-making. The federal government entered more than 400 treaties with various Indian tribes from 1778 to 1871. In these treaties, the United…

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Trail Where They Cried [MAP]

The Cherokee Nation – largest of the Five Civilized Tribes of the Southeast – is a people of Iroquoian lineage. The Cherokee, who called themselves ‘Ani’-Yun’ wiya’ – ‘Principal People’ – the ‘Keetoowah’ – ‘People of Kituhwa’ – or Tsalagi from their own name for the Cherokee Nation – migrated to the Southeast from the Great Lakes Region.

Andrew Jackson & the Subjugation of the Native Tribes of the Southeast

“The very moment I can rid myself of them (the southeastern native tribes )…I shall certainly do so”. Such were the words of the man who would embody a nations’ view of the First Americans.  I write, of course, of Andrew Jackson. It is often asked if Jackson was a victim of outside pressures (political or otherwise) when it came…

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Chief John Ross

Cherokee – Our Hearts Are Sickened

“Our Hearts are Sickened”: Letter from Chief John Ross of the Cherokee, Georgia, 1836 By President Andrew Jackson’s election in 1828, the only large concentrations of Indian tribes remaining on the east coast were located in the South. The Cherokee had adopted the settled way of life of the surrounding—and encroaching—white society. They were consequently known, along with the Creek,…

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